Masterworks of Adventure: Atlantis and Lemuria

The Ultimate Anthology

Atlantis tales were one of the most popular Lost World sub-genres of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This Masterworks of Adventure anthology is a collection of classic tales considered to be among the best and most influential works. We started with 333: A Bibliography of the Science-Fantasy Novel, by Crawford, Donahue and Grant (1953), which lists the best works published before 1950, then cross-referenced them with Science-fiction, the Early Years by Everett Franklin Bleiler and Jessica Amanda Salmonson’s Lost Race Check Guide, the ultimate checklist for collectors. You’ll find stories told in a variety of styles:adventure, dystopian, dark fantasy, philosophical adventure and pulp fiction. Some have been made available for Kindle for the very first time and are exclusive to ROH Press.

American Edition: 12 works
European and Australian Edition: 16 works
Canadian Edition: 23 works

What people are saying

The Lost Continent: "Splendidly colourful, imaginative and gloriously entertaining." ~ Lin Carter

Atlantida: “Well imagined, with much scholalry detail on the geography of French north Africa and the classical literature on Atlantis. The narrative is fast-moving and hold's one's interest well. All in all, perhaps the best of the older Atlantis fictions..” ~Everett Franklin Bleiler, Science-fiction, the Early Years

The Toll of the Sea: “One of the better lost races of the period, with well-realized moments, a convincing culture, reasonable characters, and competent writing.” ~Everett Franklin Bleiler, Science-fiction, the Early Years

Queen of Atlantis: Much the best of the Atkins adventures.” ~Everett Franklin Bleiler, Science-fiction, the Early Years

When the World Shook: “A really splendid romance, rich in color, fresh and gorgeous in its imaginative qualities and power, and needless to add, absorbingly interesting...” ~The New York Times (1919)

Masterworks of Adventure: Atlantis and Lemuria

The Ultimate Anthology

Now in this island of Atlantis there was a great and wonderful empire which had rule over the whole island and several others, and over parts of the continent, but there occurred violent earthquakes and floods; and in a single day and night of misfortune the island disappeared in the depths of the sea.” ~Plato, Timaeus & Critias

Atlantis tales were one of the most popular Lost World sub-genres of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. You could argue that it’s still the most popular Lost World sub-genre today. Plato’s tale of a sunken world has spawned countless, books, films and TV shows. The survivors of that sunken continent appeared to have scattered to every corner of the globe, founding new civilizations on every continent, in isolated jungles, underground, or beneath the waves.

This Masterworks of Adventure anthology is a collection of classic tales considered to be among the best and most influential works. We started with 333: A Bibliography of the Science-Fantasy Novel, by Crawford, Donahue and Grant (1953), which lists the best works published before 1950, then cross-referenced them with Science-fiction, the Early Years by Everett Franklin Bleiler and Jessica Amanda Salmonson’s Lost Race Check Guide, the ultimate checklist for collectors. You’ll find stories told in a variety of styles: adventure, dystopian, dark fantasy, philosophical adventure and pulp fiction. Some have been made available for Kindle for the very first time and are exclusive to ROH Press.

It didn’t take long to discover that critics don’t always agree. Will you like every tale in this collection? Maybe, maybe not. Tastes are personal. But there is a lot to choose from! A few tales of note: The Lost Continent by C. J. Cutcliffe Hyne is considered by most to be the ‘ultimate tale’ of ancient Atlantis (Salmonson described it as ‘among the best novels ever on the subject’); Bleiler chose Atlantida by Pierre Benoit as his personal favourite, but he also spoke highly of Roy Norton’s The Toll of the Sea, describing it as ‘one of the better lost races of the period’ (I agree, it’s been unjustly forgotten!) If a brilliant tale filled with weird imagination is your thing, then check out A. Merritt’s The Face in the Abyss; if you prefer some philosophy (or a lot) with your adventure, H. Rider Haggard’s When the World Shook may be the way to go. Two novels in this anthology were written by women: Claimed! by Gertrude Barrows Bennett, an excellent fast-paced dark fantasy tale, and Fugitive Anne by Rosa Campbell Praed, one of the rare novels in the genre with a female protagonist. For those of you who want a little sword and sorcery, check out Robert E.Howard’s Kull Saga and Henry Kuttner’s Elak of Atlantis series, 7 action-packed tales of pulp adventure. Enjoy!

Tales of Atlantis
The Lost Continent by C. J. Cutcliffe Hyne

The Kull Saga by Robert E. Howard
The Shadow Kingdom
The Mirrors of Tuzun Thune
Kings of the Night

The Erlak of Atlantis Series by Henry Kuttner
Thunder in the Dawn
The Spawn of Dagon
Beyond the Phoenix
Dragon Moon

Atlanteans in Africa
Atlantida by Pierre Benoit
When the World Shook by H. Rider Haggard

Atlanteans in the Sargasso Sea
A Queen of Atlantis by Frank Aubrey

Atlanteans in South America
The Devil-Tree of Eldorado by Frank Aubrey
The Face in the Abyss by A. Merritt
The Toll of the Sea by Roy Norton (First Kindle Edition)
The Treasure of Atlantis by J. Allan Dunn

Atlanteans in Southeast Asia
City of Wonder by E. Charles Vivian

Atlanteans and Lemurians in Australia
Fugitive Anne by Rosa Campbell Praed
The Last Lemurian by George Firth Scott

Lemurians in the Pacific Isles
The Island of Captain Sparrow by S. Fowler Wright

Atlantis Under the Sea
The Maracot Deep by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The Scarlet Empire by David M. Parry (First Kindle Edition)
Atlantis Exile by Cyril Hume

And for something completely different…
Claimed! by Gertrude Barrows Bennett